Tag Archives: History

At the west edge of Brentwood hides a Nazi past

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murphyranch1

Murphy Ranch, located off the Rustic Canyon Trail, was a Nazi commune in the making until the man behind it all was arrested during WWII by the FBI.

Summertime at Camp Josepho in Topanga State Park might be filled with Boy Scouts honing their BB-gun-slinging skills, fine-tuning their eye for archery or earning an equestrian merit badge.  But less than a mile south of the youth camp lies a more sinister history.

Murphy Ranch, just off the Rustic Canyon Trail at the west edge of Brentwood, was supposed to be a safe haven for Nazis and the future of the Fourth Reich.  But its founders’ plans went sour after it turned out Nazi Germany was not going to bring about the New World Order in the United States and would eventually be defeated by the Allied powers of WWII.

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Return to Linda Vista Community Hospital

Please note: The author of this blog does not encourage trespassing in any way, shape, or form.  The Linda Vista Community Hospital is currently not open to the public and is available as a filming location; visit http://www.lindavistalocation.com for more information.

Linda Vista Community Hospital parking sign

This shot was originally taken during a previous visit to the Linda Vista Community Hospital, formerly the Santa Fe Coastlines Hospital.

Fifty years ago at Linda Vista Community Hospital, doctors would have been calling out to nurses for patients’ records, the nurses would have hurried to the patients’ bedsides in scrubs, and the patients might have been complaining about the obligatory tasteless hospital food.  Today, this scenario would only take place after the words “Lights, camera, action” were shouted after the snap of a clapperboard.

As promised in a previous post, another visit was paid to the Linda Vista Community Hospital in Boyle Heights (Unfortunately, the usual DSLR camera used for shooting was out of commission for the day, hence the camera phone photos).

The prior post incorrectly stated the hospital was built in 1937; it was in fact established in 1904, says Francis Kortekaas, who has managed the location for the last 20 or so years.

Originally built to service Santa Fe Railroad employees, the Santa Fe Coastlines Hospital had several construction phases in 1925, 1931, 1938, 1961 and 1966, according to the California State Parks’ Office of Historical Preservation.  The different decades’ architectural styles are evident in the building’s six floors, and a stroll through the hospital will transport visitors through time from Classic Revival to Art Deco to Streamline Modern periods.  Eventually, in 1937, it became the Linda Vista Community Hospital.

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On this day 100 years ago…

On Feb. 6, 1909, the L.A. Times ran the following story:

ABOVE THE CLOUDS

BALLOONS TO SAIL

ON PLEASURE TRIP

The two large balloons, the United States and the American, are to make a short flight from Chutes Park Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock.  Ordinary gas is being used, and the work of inflating is progressing satisfactorily.  At a late hour last night the American, which will be piloted by Capt. A. E. Meuller, was nearly filled, and the United States, which is to be handled by Roy Knabenshue, was more than one-half full.

The flight will in no way be a race, as it is expected that the large bags will be in the air for only a few hours.  The trip is to be made for weather observations, and to arouse interest in the sport of ballooning.

Each of the balloons is to carry four men, including the pilots.  They are to be Capt. Meuller, Roy Knabenshue, W. D. Fuller of the Weather Bureau, Lieut. C. K. Currie of the United States Corps of Engineers, a reporter from each of the morning papers, and a representative of the Associated Press.

Fifteen or twenty of the Chutes Park homing pigeons are to be taken along, and will be used to send back messages of the location and conditions of the balloons and men.

Chutes Park was amusement park south of downtown L.A., spanning from South Grand Avenue and South Main Street between Washington Boulevard and West 21st Street.  See LAist’s  LAistory on Chutes Park and Downtown News’ “The Short Life of a Downtown Amusement Park” for more detailed stories of the attraction, which existed from 1887 to 1914; today, it’s the site of a parking lot for the home furnishings store, L.A. Mart.

 View of the Washington Gardens Amusement Park (also called Chutes Park), which shows the Chutes water ride and Chutes Theater next to it.  Courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library historical photo archives.

View of the Washington Gardens Amusement Park (also called Chutes Park), which shows the Chutes water ride and Chutes Theater next to it. Courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library historical photo archives.

Today, Washington & Grand is also the site of a Metro Blue Line stop, and L.A. Mart can be seen in the background.  Courtesy of tommyhenrich at Panoramio.com.

Today, Washington & Grand is also the site of a Metro Blue Line stop,
and L.A. Mart can be seen in the background. Courtesy of tommyhenrich at Panoramio.com.